Megnut

Out of the Loop in New York City

A pretty long article in today's New York Times, Out of the Loop in Silicon Valley, looks at the dearth of women in tech, both in leadership roles at large companies and as entrepreneurs with their own start-ups. There's no new information about why women aren't present in any significant amounts, or about why less women study comp sci or engineering in college. And after various interviews and mentions of "women like jobs with more interaction with people", it closes on this optimistic note:

Silicon Valley shows signs of changing, albeit slowly. New organizations are sprouting up for young women in tech, like Girls in Tech and Women 2.0. One-quarter of the partners at Kleiner Perkins, the venture capital firm, are women, and some of the hottest start-ups -- including Gilt, Hunch, Ning, Eventbrite and Meebo -- were founded or co-founded by women.

They could change things for the next generation of girls aspiring to engineering careers and women already entering the field, Ms. Fleming hopes. "If their success becomes visible, so girls can identify with it, they will think, 'Oh yeah, anyone can do this,'" she says.

But why would this be true? Three of the most successful start-ups from Web 1.0, Blogger, Flickr, and Six Apart (and I define successful as millions of users, transformed how people do things on the Web, two acquired for large sums of money by the biggest companies in the Valley) were co-founded by women. Not one of these companies or women was mentioned in the article, though all companies have existed for nearly a decade or more.

If an article asks "In the wide-open world of tech, why so few women?" and can't even acknowledge some of the early female leaders, how can we expect anyone else to know that there are women entrepreneurs. In the quote above, a woman says "if their success becomes visible." Key word here apparently is if.

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