The chef and staff of…

The chef and staff of Montreal's Au Pied de Cochon wrote their new cookbook over two years on Mondays, when the restaurant is closed. "That is also the day when they do their pickling and preserving, so they held editorial meetings while making enough cornichons and corn relish to last through the winter." They self-published and sold out their first press run of 6,000 copies in three weeks. It sounds like a crazy, entertaining cookbook. I'd really like to eat there on my next trip to Montreal, whenever that is.

Looking for something for someone…

Retro Half ApronLooking for something for someone who's Oh So Retro? What about this Oh So Retro Half Apron. It's red with white polka dots. "Half-length apron with a flattering, slimming style and a flirty, flared skirt. Long ties at the waist make it adjustable for many sizes." And machine-washable! There's only one in stock like this, but the seller has other awesome aprons to chose from. $25 from Etsy.

It's official, the end times…

It's official, the end times are upon us. Erin McKean, Editor-in-Chief of American Dictionaries, appeared on the Rachael Ray show last week to present a Certificate of Recognition to Rachael. EVOO is going into the next edition of the Oxford American College Dictionary. That's extra-virgin olive oil, for all you non-Food Network, non-Rachael Ray folks out there. Now that's it's official, I'm shall start to use it, but I'll pronounce it "ee-vous".

The 'molecular' in molecular gastronomy…

The 'molecular' in molecular gastronomy has the same definition as it does in molecular biology. The similarity is intentional, because chemistry and physics are at the core of this discipline. Interesting paper by Hervé This about the science of cooking. Includes a list of New Dishes named after Famous Chemists, such as the Baumé, names after French chemist Antoine Baumé.

Over the weekend, my friend…

Over the weekend, my friend Leslie passed away. Even though Leslie and I both loved to cook, somehow we never cooked for each other. That seems so odd now, I'm not sure how it happened, and I so wish we had. There was talk of a shipment of Madeleines to my door at one point, but that's as close as I came to tasting her food. So instead of cooking for each other, we shared advice about food with each other.

For my tips on turkey brining, I received in return two full pages of New York City recommendations from someone who knew and loved the city better than almost anyone I know. When she returned to New York to visit, she insisted on taking me to Pastis, and introduced me to their green beans. I'll never eat them again without thinking of Leslie. She even had a VIP phone number for reservations at Pastis and tried to share it with me, encouraging me to use it while she was living in San Francisco and unable to take advantage of it. "How could I pass for you?" I asked her, "That's crazy!" They all knew her there, she was a memorable figure. There was no way I could walk in and give my name as Leslie.

Whenever I go to a Le Gamin cafe, I can hear her voice in the menu items. I can hear her articulating the deliciousness of Oeufs Gamin. I can hear her emphatically stating that the cafe au lait at Le Gamin is The. Best. In. The. City. I've never dared have one anywhere else since I moved here. Of course, she didn't share her food tips with me alone, she posted pictures and recipes of an entire vegetarian dinner with recipes to Flickr.

I've been looking for a good recipe for my Christmas cookies this year. Fittingly, Leslie's last advent calendar post contained a recipe for Simple Sugar Cookies. When I saw it, I noticed she hadn't posted a frosting recipe. I'd planned to email her about it. I'm certain the one she would have shared with me would have been the best. Leslie wouldn't have had it any other way.

Is a restaurant worth its…

Is a restaurant worth its conscionable weight if it never has enough capitol/care/time to offer its employees health insurance? "Do you ask the waiter if the chicken is free-range if you don't care whether he/she's making a living wage? Can you say you believe in immigrant's rights if you eat in a restaurant that hires undocumented workers because they're cheaper and won't complain about low wages/lack of healthcare/unbearable working conditions/boring, repetitive tasks/long hours without overtime? Can you preach the Organic values of a restaurant whose kitchen is 25% unpaid 'volunteer' workers?" Shuna asks if the public is ready for a transparent restaurant industry. I wonder if they're ready for the price increases that would accompany it.