Megnut

The authors of two new sushi books separate the facts from the fishy. Time Out New York summarizes all you need to know about eating sushi, or as they put it, "must-have intel for your next fish-and-rice repast."

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Great comments about Sushi. Thanks! Sitting at the Sushi bar and seeing how the chef prepares the Sushi for you is one of greatest experiences you can have. If you speak Japanese it is even greater!

“Chefs are always making conscious decisions about how they allocate their food,” I like this part. It's indeed true!! Great sushi chef also has good ears. They always hearing what guests are saying while being busy preparing food. I whispered "hmm ikura looks good" then on the next second, the chef gently rolled ikura sushi for me.

Donald Richie's "A Taste of Japan" is a superb history and appreciation of Japanese food (it's out of print, but used copies are pretty easy to find on-line), with compelling writing and plenty of photos. The introduction brings the concepts behind Japanese cuisine to life, and then the book dives into the major food types, starting with sushi, then onto such foods as tempura, noodles, cutlets (tonkatsu), pickles (tsukemono), and desserts.

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