Megnut

Put your fresh salad greens in a big plastic bag, gather up the neck, blow a little air (a.k.a carbon dioxide) inside, then seal it up quick. Apparently this trick will keep your greens "bright, firm, and flavorful for at least a week."

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I might give it a try in my own kitchen, but I can't imagine wanting to eat greens that have been steeping in someone else's breath for a week.

I was just about to say that, "mmmmm, breathy greens."

CO2 canisters are readily available, and though not free like bad breath, I see a Ronco product in our futures...

I might give it a try in my own kitchen, but I can't imagine wanting to eat greens that have been steeping in someone else's breath for a week.

Yeah, it's a great idea for singles like me (I struggle to eat them all before they spoil), but perhaps it might be less appealing for serving to others.

i always do this when taking bulk greens home from the store. the puffy bag also keeps the greens from getting squished from inattentive baggers in the checkout line.

I actually do the reverse of this and it works well for me. I prep my greens, wrap them (still slightly damp) in a paper towel, and *exclude* air by sealing in a ziploc. I have had pre-washed greens last for nearly a week this way.

To be fair, I do this with tough supermarket lettuce, and haven't tried it with the fresher, delicate stuff from the garden.

I will have to try this. I also struggle to eat the fresh lettuce before it goes bad but hate to throw it out. Or perhaps I will try the air excluding method, might take up less room in my refrig!

couldn't you just hang them upside down somewhere in a nice cool, dry place? if they dry out completely, hey - you've got fresh (dry) herbs.

oh - you're talking about salad greens. heh heh, never mind.

BUT WAIT ---

a nice bunch of dried salad greens crumbled over a hot, goat cheese cheese omelet are amazing!! ;)

I take my greens, wash and dry them very well, and store them in a tupperware container that has a layer of paper towels in the bottom. Works like a charm and they stay crisp for a week (although the arugula has a tendency to yellow after five days or so...)

When I worked in a delicatessen, we took our washed and dried greens and put them in a plastic bag with a paper towel in the bottom, and squeezed out some of the air and tied it closed... worked well for a few days storage (they never needed to last longer than that...)

Our simple solution is to use a salad spinner. After washing and spin drying the greens, pour out any excess water and store in the fridge. Easily keeps for days.

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